zaterdag 16 december 2017

2018


This issuance celebrates the phenomenon of bioluminescence — the ability of some species to glow — with a pane of 20 stamps featuring 10 life-forms that create their own light.
-

Birds in Winter celebrates four of winter’s winged beauties: the black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus), the northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis), the blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata), and the red-bellied woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus).
-

Byodo-In Temple (Priority Mail)
This Priority Mail stamp features a colorful illustration of the Byodo-In Temple, a popular tourist attraction in Hawai‘i.
-

Dragons The Postal Service celebrates dragons, the high-flying, fire-breathing mythological creatures that have roamed our imaginations for millennia.
-

With this stamp, the Postal Service marks the 200th anniversary of the Flag Act of 1818, which gave us the basic design of the current American flag: 13 stripes symbolizing the original 13 colonies and one star for each state in the union.
-

Frozen Treats features frosty, colorful icy pops on a stick. The tasty, sweet confections come in a variety of shapes and flavors.
-

This stamp celebrates the 200th anniversary of Illinois statehood. Known as the Prairie State, Illinois became the 21st state of the union on Dec. 3, 1818.
-

The newest stamp in the Music Icons series honors singer and songwriter John Lennon (1940–1980), a rock ’n’ roll hero successful both as a founding member of the Beatles and as a solo artist.
-

The 41st issuance in the Black Heritage series honors the achievements of legendary performer and civil rights activist Lena Horne (1917–2010). Remembered as one of America’s great interpreters of popular songs, Horne also was a trailblazer in Hollywood for women of color. She used her personal elegance, charisma and fame to become an important spokesperson for civil rights.
-

Love Flourishes is the latest stamp in the Love series. The stamp art features a fanciful garden of colorful flowers surrounding the word “Love.”
-

Meyer Lemons is a 2-cent definitive stamp. The stamp art features a whole Meyer lemon next to two wedges of the cut fruit.
-

Fred Rogers (1928–2003) was known as a beloved television neighbor to generations of children. His groundbreaking public television series Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood inspired and educated young viewers with warmth, sensitivity and honesty.
-

With the release of O Beautiful, the Postal Service commemorates the beauty and majesty of the United States through images that correspond with one of the nation’s most beloved songs, “America the Beautiful.”
-

Peace Rose celebrates one of the most popular roses of all time. The peace rose revolutionized hybrid tea roses with its unique coloring, hardiness, and disease resistance.
-

America’s first woman in space, Sally Ride (1951–2012), inspired the nation as a pioneering astronaut, brilliant physicist and dedicated educator.
-

Sleeping Bear Dunes (Priority Mail Express)
With this Priority Mail Express stamp, the Postal Service celebrates the Sleeping Bear Dunes, a national park in Michigan that takes its name from a Native American legend.
-

These Forever stamps celebrate the role of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education in keeping our nation a global leader in innovation. Designed to pique the curiosity of the viewer, each of these four stamps features a collage of faces, symbols, drawings and numbers that represent the complexity and interconnectedness of the STEM disciplines.
-

The Postal Service celebrates the art of magic with this pane of 20 stamps featuring digital illustrations of five classic tricks magicians use to amaze and delight audiences: a rabbit in a hat (production), a fortune teller using a crystal ball (prediction), a woman floating in the air (levitation), an empty bird cage (vanishing), and a bird emerging from a flower (transformation).
-

For more than half a century, U.S. stamps have depicted the American flag in vivid red, white and blue. This eye-catching new issuance continues that tradition with a striking graphic design of a flag with two crisp folds.
-

With this stamp, the Postal Service pays tribute to the sacrifice of American soldiers and millions of supporters on the home front who experienced World War I. Entering World War I (1914–1918) in its later stages, the United States helped turn the tide of war in favor of the Allies.
-

The Year of the Dog stamp is the 11th of 12 stamps in the Celebrating Lunar New Year series. The Year of the Dog begins Feb. 16, 2018, and ends Feb. 4, 2019.
-

maandag 2 januari 2017

2017


The player on one stamp wears a contemporary uniform, using modern equipment; on the other a player is wearing vintage garb and using old-fashioned equipment. The tete-beche (attached head to tail) stamps are arranged to mirror each other.
-

The latest United States semipostal stamp is a fund raiser to fight Alzheimer’s. This dreaded neurodegenerative disease has evaded all attempts to find a cure or even a significant reduction in the rate and amount of deterioration, as government agencies and pharmaceutical companies around the world have spent billions on failed attempts.
-



Crop pollination by insects contributes approximately $15 billion of produce to the U.S. economy each year. Trending declines in their populations serve as reminders that pollinators can be helped by planting pollinator gardens with native flowers or heirloom varieties of fruits and vegetables.
  
-


The villains are: the Queen (“Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”), Honest John (“Pinocchio”), Lady Tremaine (“Cinderella”), the Queen of Hearts (“Alice in Wonderland”), Captain Hook (“Peter Pan”), Maleficent (“Sleeping Beauty”), Cruella De Vil (“One Hundred and One Dalmatians”), Ursula (“The Little Mermaid”), Gaston (“Beauty and the Beast”) and Scar (“The Lion King”).
-




Tens of millions of people in the United States hope to view this rare event, which has not been seen on the U.S. mainland since 1979. The eclipse will travel a narrow path across the entire country for the first time since 1918. The path will run west to east from Oregon to South Carolina and will include portions of 14 states. 
-



-


The Green Succulent global forever stamp will be valid to send a 1-ounce letter to any country where first-class mail international service is available. The stamp, which features a photograph of an echeveria, a succulent native to the Americas.
-


Most widely known for dressing the nation's first ladies and celebrities, Oscar de la Renta (1932–2014) was one of the world's leading fashion designers for more than 50 years. He is said to have elevated American style and brought international attention to New York as a world leader in fashion
-



The Gateway Arch is a 630-foot (192 m) monument in St. Louis in the U.S. state of Missouri. Clad in stainless steel and built in the form of an inverted, weighted catenary arch, it is the world's tallest arch, the tallest man-made monument in the Western Hemisphere, and Missouri's tallest accessible building. Built as a monument to the westward expansion of the United States, it is the centerpiece of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial and has become an internationally famous symbol of St. Louis.
The arch sits at the site of St. Louis' founding on the west bank of the Mississippi River.
The Gateway Arch was designed by Finnish-American architect Eero Saarinen in 1947; construction began on February 12, 1963, and was completed on October 28, 1965, for $13 million (equivalent to $190 million in 2015). The monument opened to the public on June 10, 1967

-




Liliʻuokalani Park and Gardens is a 30-acre (120,000 m2) park with Japanese gardens, located on Banyan Drive in Hilo on the island of Hawaiʻi.
The park's site was given by Queen Liliʻuokalani, and lies southeast of downtown Hilo, on the Waiakea Peninsula in Hilo Bay. Much of the park now consists of Edo-style Japanese gardens, built in the early 1900s, and said to be the largest such gardens outside Japan. The gardens contain Waihonu Pond as well as bridges, koi ponds, pagodas, statues, torii, and a Japanese teahouse.

-


The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) is a Smithsonian Institution museum established in December 2003. The museum's building, designed by David Adjaye, is on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.. It has close to 37,000 objects in its collection related to such subjects as community, family, the visual and performing arts, religion, civil rights, slavery, and segregation.
Early efforts to establish a federally owned museum featuring African-American history and culture can be traced to 1915, although the modern push for such an organization did not begin until the 1970s. After years of little success, a much more serious legislative push began in 1988 that led to authorization of the museum in 2003. A site was selected in 2006. The museum opened September 24, 2016, in a ceremony led by U.S. President Barack Obama.

-




Andrew Newell Wyeth July 12, 1917 – January 16, 2009) was a visual artist, primarily a realist painter, working predominantly in a regionalist style. He was one of the best-known U.S. artists of the middle 20th century.
In his art, Wyeth's favorite subjects were the land and people around him, both in his hometown of Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, and at his summer home in Cushing, Maine. Wyeth often noted: "I paint my life." One of the best-known images in 20th-century American art is his painting Christina's World, currently in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. This tempera was painted in 1948, when Wyeth was 31 years old.

-


California Dogface Butterfly

-


Boutonniere, Corsage

-


Wedding Stamp

-



Central and South American, Mexican and Caribbean foods on American cuisine

-


Dorothy Irene Height (March 24, 1912 – April 20, 2010), an American administrator and educator, was a civil rights and women's rights activist specifically focused on the issues of African-American women, including unemployment, illiteracy, and voter awareness. She was the president of the National Council of Negro Women for forty years and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1994 and the Congressional Gold Medal in 2004.

-



Theodore Martin Hesburgh, (May 25, 1917 – February 26, 2015), was a priest of the Congregation of Holy Cross, was president of the University of Notre Dame for 35 years. He is the namesake for TIAA–CREF's Hesburgh Award.

-



Flowers that come from typical American gardens

-



Baseball, basketball, football, golf, kickball, soccer, tennis and volleyball

-



Henry David Thoreau, July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) was an American essayist, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, and historian. A leading transcendentalist, Thoreau is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay "Civil Disobedience" (originally published as "Resistance to Civil Government"), an argument for disobedience to an unjust state.

-



John Fitzgerald "Jack" Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), commonly referred to by his initials JFK, was an American politician who served as the 35th President of the United States from January 1961 until his assassination in November 1963

-



Love is in the air
-



The 200th anniversary of Mississippi statehood, which was admitted to the Union as the 20th state. The Territory of Mississippi was established in 1798, but early growth was hindered by claims by the State of Georgia and Spanish interference. With the development of the cotton industry, settlement of the Territory grew rapidly, and on December 10, 1817 “the Magnolia State” was admitted to the Union 

-



The 150th anniversary of Nebraska's statehood. Nebraska was established as a territory by the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 and was admitted to the Union as the 37th state on March 1, 1867, after agreeing that suffrage would not be denied to non-white voters. 

-



Two of North America's most iconic: the monarch butterfly and the western honeybee, each shown industriously pollinating a variety of plants native to the continent. These particular species exemplify the ecological service provided by all pollinators, which include other insects, birds, and bats.

-




Robert Panara, an influential teacher and a pioneer in the field of deaf studies. During his 40-year teaching career, Panara inspired generations of students with his powerful use of American Sign Language.

-



Americans exhibit a fascination with seashells.

-



Five species that inhabit American waters: mako shark, represented by a shortfin mako; thresher shark, on the stamp a pelagic thresher; great white shark; whale shark; and hammerhead shark

-




Uncle Sam's Hat

-



U.S. Flag

-



WPA Posters
-



The Year of the Rooster begins January 28, 2017 and ends February 15, 2018. In popular Chinese culture,

-



Four famous Christmas carols: "Jingle Bells," "Deck the Halls, "Silent Night" and "Jolly Old Saint Nicholas."

-



"The Snowy Day,"  Written and illustrated by the children's author, Ezra Jack Keats, it was one of the first prominent 20th-century picture books centered on an African-American child. Each of the four new stamps in this booklet features a different illustration of main character Peter exploring and playing in his neighborhood while wearing his red snowsuit. The images picture Peter forming a snowball, sliding down a mountain of snow, making a snow angel and leaving footprints in the snow.

-